Hearing Loss

Hearing loss can affect anyone, and at any point during a person’s life. It affects different people to varying degrees and for different reasons, and can be triggered by any number of environmental and biological factors.

Because the loss typically develops gradually, you may not notice the loss of subtle everyday sounds such as a ticking clock or a rustling newspaper. Before you realize it, you are missing sounds critical to effective communication.

Living with untreated loss means difficulties in conversations with loved ones, at social gatherings, and work settings. Untreated, hearing loss makes it challenging to keep up with everyday life. Treatment can lead to a better quality of life by improving personal relationships, reducing anger and frustration, and providing better control of one’s life.

Results of the audiometric evaluation are plotted on a chart called an audiogram. Loudness is plotted from top to bottom. Frequency, from low to high, is plotted from left to right. Hearing loss (HL) is measured in decibels (dB) and is described in general categories. Hearing loss is not measured in percentages. The general hearing loss categories used by most hearing professionals are as follows:

  • Normal hearing (0 to 25 dB HL)
  • Mild hearing loss (26 to 40 dB HL)
  • Moderate hearing loss (41 to 70 dB HL)
  • Severe hearing loss (71 to 90 dB HL)
  • Profound hearing loss (greater than 91 dB HL)

Types of Hearing Loss

The external and the middle ear conduct and transform sound; the inner ear receives it. When there is aproblem in the external or middle ear, a conductive hearing impairment occurs. When the problem is in the inner ear, a sensorineural or hair cell loss is the result. Difficulty in both the middle and inner ear results in a mixed hearing impairment (i.e. conductive and a sensorineural impairment). Central hearing loss has more to do with the brain than the ear, and will be discussed only briefly.

Conductive hearing loss occurs when sound is not conducted efficiently through the ear canal, eardrum, or tiny bones of the middle ear, resulting in a reduction of the loudness of sound that is heard. Conductive losses may result from earwax blocking the ear canal, fluid in the middle ear, middle ear infection,obstructions in the ear canal, perforations (hole) in the eardrum membrane, or disease of any of the three middle ear bones.

A person with a conductive hearing loss may notice that their ears may seem to be full or plugged. This person may speak softly because they hear their own voice quite loudly. Crunchy foods, such as celery or carrots, sound very loud and this person may have to stop chewing to hear what is being said. All conductive hearing losses should be evaluated by a physician to explore medical and surgical options.

Sensorineural hearing loss is the most common type of hearing loss. More than 90 percent of all hearing aid wearers have sensorineural hearing loss. The most common causes of sensorineural hearing loss are age related changes and noise exposure. A sensorineural hearing loss may also result from disturbance of inner ear circulation, increased inner fluid pressure or from disturbances of nerve transmission. Sensorineural hearing loss is also called “cochlear loss,” an “inner ear loss” and is also commonly called “nerve loss.” Years ago, many professionals said there was nothing that could be done for sensorineural hearing loss – that is totally incorrect today. There are many excellent options for the patient with sensorineural hearing
loss.

A person with a sensorineural hearing loss may report that they can hear people talking, but they can’t understand what they are saying. An increase in the loudness of speech may only add to their confusion. This person will usually hear better in quiet places and may have difficulty understanding what is said over the telephone.

Central hearing impairment occurs when auditory centers of the brain are affected by injury, disease, tumor, hereditary, or unknown causes. Loudness of sound is not necessarily affected, although understanding of speech, also thought of as the “clarity” of speech may be affected. Certainly both loudness and clarity may be affected too.

New Technology for today’s world

Experience ReSound LiNX2™, the revolutionary hearing aid from ReSound

ReSound LiNX2 represents the next step forward in hearing aid technology. Designed to connect directly with your iPhone®, iPad® or iPod touch®, ReSound LiNX2 provides 360-degree hearing in a package that’s smarter, smaller and more connected.
Learn More

Special Promotion

Make an appointment today and receive $500 off a pair of ReSound LiNX, Level 9 . These are known as the world's smartest hearing aid. Small yet powerful, with amazing sound quality.

Contact us today to discover the power of better hearing.